Beam houses

Timber was most probably the first material prehistoric man used to build his own home about 12,000 years ago. Timber architecture reached its peak in the late medieval era, eventually forced to the background in the 19th century by the widespread construction of apartment blocks and a general shift in housing preferences. More than 100 years had to pass for a renaissance of timber building to be welcome and accepted by society.

Modern timber architecture – against all rumours – will not bind the hands of the conservatively oriented architect. Custom-designed houses, according to preferences of their residents permit the same degree of architectural freedom, both in terms of structure and appearance as any conventional brick building would.

 

Advantages:

Wood

  • is the only renewable building material
  • It has advantageous recycling properties, if not treated chemically beforehand.
  • Its production and machining are not energy intensive processes. Producing and processing 1 m³ of wood consumes 500 kWh, while producing 1m³ of reinforced concrete requires 2000 kWh. Half of the wood’s energy requirement is consumed by drying the timber.
  • Among conventional building materials, wood possesses the best weight/strength ratio.
  • As a natural raw material, its thermal insulation capability resulting from its favourable space climatic properties creates a comfortable surface temperature and a harmonious living environment.
  • In comparison to conventional interior mortars, wood can bind and store ten times more moisture from the air, influencing the room’s humidity favourably.
  • It inhibits the formation of electrostatic charging, which may be problematic for plastics (e.g. for fitted carpet).

Our workshop uses the beam house technology – having its long traditions also in Hungary – to design structural elements of custom-built residential and weekend houses and structurally complete buildings.

The load bearing structure of the building is made of 84 mm thick single beam or 84-110-124-164 mm glulam Scots pine beams. The beams are joined by multiple grooves for better thermal insulation’s sake. The stability of the structure is ensured by transversely joined beams at the corners. The single piece beams are made from winter-felled Hungarian Scots pine, dried and seasoned under natural conditions. The glulam beams are made of Siberian Scots pine, seasoned by the faster and more reliable kiln drying process, and glued from two, three or four layers. The structural material of the buildings are cut to size entirely at our site using a CNC controlled Hundegger K.2 joinery machine. This state of the art technology ensures perfect fitting of the wall, floor and roof structures.

By placing the thermal insulation on the inside of the structural walls, a wall structure may be created that exceeds thermal insulation requirements currently set for residential buildings by several fold.

Internal cladding may be made of wood, plasterboard, etc. For internal timber wall cladding, we manufacture a wide range of wall cladding materials and strip floor from a large variety of wood species. For side walls, the most commonly used cladding method is the wide strip floor identical in appearance to uninsulated beam walls. The internal thermally insulated layer also provides room for concealing the necessary cabling and piping installations.

As for the other structures of the building (floor and roof structures), it is possible to make designs according to custom preferences, to incorporate glulam or single beam load bearing structures and to create claddings from various materials in various colours.

The other wooden structures of the building are also produced in our workshop: doors and windows, staircases and handrails made using state of the art technology, in custom sizes and shapes. Our company’s motto – „Everything that’s made of wood” – is literally applicable to the buildings we produce, i.e. all timber structures we build in are produced in our plant, enabling us to fully meet individual requirements and maintain high quality.

 

The timber houses we build are constructed in full consideration of the custom requirements of the customer, according to individual designs.

The structurally complete condition includes the structures of the walls, floors and roofs, the roof cover (tiling), its external doors and windows, erected on the substructure prepared by the customer.

For further information regarding beam houses and their construction and for quotations, do not hesitate to seek our assistance!

Thermal insulation values for beam houses and some comparative values:

– thermal insulation requirements for residential houses:  0.24 W/m2/K (the lower the value, the better thermally insulated the wall structure is)
– 84 mm thick beam wall without thermal insulation: 1.23 W/m2K
– with supplementary thermal insulation and strip floor,

5 cm thermal insulation + 2 cm timber cladding: 0.56 W/m2K

10 cm thermal insulation + 2 cm timber cladding: 0.29 W/m2K

20 cm thermal insulation + 2 cm timber cladding: 0.17 W/m2K

– 116 mm thick beam wall without thermal insulation: 0.988 W/m2K

– with supplementary thermal insulation and strip floor,

5 cm thermal insulation + 2 cm timber cladding: 0.414 W/m2K

10 cm thermal insulation + 2 cm timber cladding: 0.273 W/m2K

– 124 mm thick beam wall without thermal insulation: 0.89 W/m2K

– with supplementary thermal insulation and strip floor,

5 cm thermal insulation + 2 cm timber cladding: 0.40 W/m2K

10 cm thermal insulation + 2 cm timber cladding: 0.26 W/m2K

– 164 mm thick beam wall without thermal insulation: 0.70 W/m2K

– with supplementary thermal insulation and strip floor,

5 cm thermal insulation + 2 cm timber cladding:  0.35 W/m2K

10 cm thermal insulation + 2 cm timber cladding: 0.24 W/m2K

– frame wall with interior and exterior timber cladding and 20 cm thermal insulation: 0.18 W/m2K         


References

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